Wednesday, April 11, 2007

Since when does "Chevrolet" rhyme with "jet set"?

That new series of Chevy ads bugs me in so many ways. I like that they're playing off songs that mention their brand, becaise there are a lot of them, it's an iconic brand name.

But I hate that, in the print ads, they say things like "little red Corvette" or whatever and they show a BLACK Corvette. Or they say "an old gold Chevy" and show a RED Chevy. I guess they don't want to be too literal, but it feels like they went the other way.

It also bugs me that they play a snippet of that George Jones/Tammy Wynette song, "No we're not the jet set, we're the old Chevrolet set." I hate that the song rhymes "Chevrolet" with "jet set." Ugh.

But it could be worse. Some person on Yahoo! Answers thought the lyics were "no, we're not the JETSONS." Heh.

7 comments:

PJ in NH said...

What bothers me about the Chevy ads is that I have yet to hear American Pie -- .. drove my Chevy to the levy but the levy was dry.. What gives?

Anonymous said...

I thought they were saying Jetsons too! Not a big fan of country music (or The Jetsons) so I'd never heard that song before. Now it's even MORE annoying! Thanks for clearing that up, Gael! :)

Anonymous said...

To nitpick, they don't rhyme "Chevrolet" with "Jet Set" -- they rhyme it with "Chevrolet Set." Why, it's almost like Shakespeare! -- rhymes on the page, but not when said aloud in modern pronunciation ('Cause you know once, long ago, that T on the end was pronounced even in French.)

Gael said...

Huh? Sure they do--they sing "no we're not the Jet Set/ we're the old Chevrolet Set." Sounds like rhyming "jet set" and "Chevrolet set" to me.

Anonymous said...

Get over it!!! It's nice to see a car company actually using good songs in their commercials for once.

Anonymous said...

I love that song!! :}
(There's no Riviera, in Festus, Missouri (pronounced Missoura) :)

Anonymous said...

"Drove my Chevy to the levy..." Really dumb commercial, considering The Levy was a bar in New Rochelle, NY where McLean grew up. It closed and thus "was dry." "...good ole boys were drinking whiskey IN Rye." (Rye, NY).